PRESS IMAGES

THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

Please contact Elizabeth Lubben to request high resolution images.

Man Ray–Human Equations: A Journey from Mathematics to Shakespeare


Man Ray, Shakespearean Equation, Twelfth Night, 1948. Oil on canvas, 34 1/8 x 30 1/8 in. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution. Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1972. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015. Photography by Lee Stalsworth

Man Ray, Mathematical Object, 1934–35. Gelatin silver print, 11 1/2 × 7 3/4 in. Collection L. Malle, Paris. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015

Mathematical Object: Curvature Circles at a Point of Negative Curvature, c. 1900. Card stock, 11 × 14 3/8 × 9 1/2 in. Brill-Schilling Collection. Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris. Photo: Elie Posner


Man Ray, Shakespearean Equation, King Lear, 1948. Oil on canvas, 18 1/8 x 24 1/8 in. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1972. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015. Photography by Cathy Carver

Man Ray, Mathematical Object, 1934–35. Gelatin silver print, 9 × 11 in. Collection L. Malle, Paris. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015

Mathematical Object: Kummer Surface with Eight Real Double Points, c. 1900. Plaster with metal supports, 7 1/2 × 11 × 5 7/8 in. Brill-Schilling Collection. Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris. Photo: Elie Posner

 


Man Ray, Shakespearean Equation, Julius Caesar, 1948. Oil on masonite, 24 × 19 3/4 in. The Rosalind & Melvin Jacobs Collection, New York. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015

Mathematical Object: Real Part of the Function w=e, c. 1900. Plaster, 9 × 12 3/8 × 7 1/2 in. Brill-Schilling Collection. Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris. Photo: Elie Posner

Man Ray, Shakespearean Equation, Romeo & Juliet, 1954. Oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 23 5/8 in. Private Collection, Courtesy Fondazione Marconi, Milan.  © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015


Mathematical Object: Surface Generated by the Normals of a Rotational Paraboloid, c. 1900. Plaster, 9 1/2 × 13 × 8 in. Brill-Schilling Collection. Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris. Photo: Elie Posner

Man Ray, Shakespearean Equation, Hamlet, 1949. Oil on canvas, 16 x 20 1/8 in. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Bequest of Lockwood Thompson 1992.301. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015

Mathematical Object: Surface of Constant Width, c. 1911–14. Plaster and wooden base, 6 3/4 × 10 1/4 × 5 1/8 in. Brill-Schilling Collection. Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris. Photo: Elie Posner


Man Ray, Endgame, 1946. Oil on canvas, 23 1/2 x 29 1/2 in. Private Collection. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015

Man Ray, Endgame, 1942. Gelatin silver print, 7 5/8 x 9 5/8 in. Private Collection, Paris. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015

Man Ray, Still life composition for "Minotaure”, 1933. Three-color carbon transfer print, 12 1/16 x 9 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015


Man Ray, Main Ray, 1935/unique replica. Assemblage: painted wooden hand and rubber ball, 9 1/16 x 3 15/16 in. The Israel Museum, Jerusalem. The Vera and Arturo Schwarz Collection of Dada and Surrealist Art in the Israel Museum, B03.0076. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015. Photo © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem by Avshalom Avital

Man Ray, Obstruction, 1920/editioned replica 1964. Assisted readymade: 63 wooden coat hangers, 43 5/16 x 47 1/4 x 47 1/4 in. The Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Gift of Beatrice (Buddy) Mayer, Chicago, to American Friends of the Israel Museum, B84.0027. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2015. Photo © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem by Avshalom Avital

Arnold Newman, Man Ray, Vine Street, Hollywood, June 13, 1948. Virtual positive from the Negative. Arnold Newman Archive, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Conceptual Forms and Mathematical Models


Hiroshi Sugimoto, Onduloid: A Surface of revolution with constant non-zero mean curavture (Mathematical Model 001), 2005. Aluminum and iron, 109 1/2 x 9 7/8 in. diam. Collection of the Artist, New York

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Surface of Revolution with Constant Negative Curvature (Mathematical Model 009), 2006. Aluminum and mirror, 76 x 27 1/2 in. diam. Pace Gallery, New York

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Dini’s Surface: A Surface of Constant Negative Curvature Obtained by Twisting a Pseudosphere (Mathematical Model 004), 2006. Aluminum and iron, 108 x 15 3/4 in. diam. Pace Gallery, New York


Hiroshi Sugimoto, Kuen’s Surface: A Surface with Constant Negative Curvature (Conceptual Form 0006), 2004. Gelatin-silver print, 58 3/4 x 47 in. Collection of the Artist, New York

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Surface of Revolution with Constant Negative Curvature (Conceptual Form 0010), 2004. Gelatin-silver print, 58 3/4 x 47 in. Collection of the Artist, New York

Bernardi Roig: NO/Escape


Bernardi Roig, An Illuminated Head for Blinky P. (The Gun), 2010. Polyester resin, marble dust, and fluorescent light. Figure life size. Courtesy Galerie Klüser, Munich

 

Bernardi Roig, An Illuminated Head for Blinky P. (The Gun), 2010. Polyester resin, marble dust, and fluorescent light. Figure life size. Courtesy Galerie Klüser, Munich

Bernardi Roig, Aceton, 2005. Polyester resin, marble dust, and fluorescent light. Figure life size. Courtesy Max Estrella Gallery, Madrid

 


Bernardi Roig, Aceton, 2005. Polyester resin, marble dust, and fluorescent light. Figure life size. Courtesy Max Estrella Gallery, Madrid

 

Bernardi Roig, Herr Mauroner, 2008. Polyester resin, marble dust, and fluorescent lights. Figure life size. Courtesy MAM Mario Maroner Contemporary, Vienna

Bernardi Roig, Insults to the Oublic, 2007. Polyester resin, marble dust, and TV/Video monitor. 22 4/5 x 8 1/4 x 9 in. Private Collection


Bernardi Roig, The Man of the Light, 2005. Polyester resin, marble dust, and fluorescent lights. Figure life size. Collection of Mirella and Dani Levinas, Washington, DC

SELECTED IMAGES


1) Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1880-81
2) Milton Avery, Black Sea, 1959, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1965
3) Pierre Bonnard, The Open Window, 1921, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1930

4) Georges Braque, The Round Table, 1929, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1934
5) Charles Burchfield, Road and Sky, 1917, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1930
6) Paul Cézanne, Self-Portrait, 1878−1880, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1928

7) Honoré Daumier, The Uprising (L'Emeute), 1848 or later, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1925
8) Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas, Dancers at the Barre, c. 1900, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1944
9) Willem de Kooning, Asheville, 1948, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1952

DOROTHY KOSINSKI, DIRECTOR


Dorothy Kosinski, Director

PHILLIPS EXTERIOR


Carriage House-Phillips Collection Center for the Study of Modern Art

Phillips Collection House-Front View

Hunter Courtyard

PHILLIPS INTERIOR


1) East Parlor, House

2) East Parlor, House

3) Foyer, House


4) Main Gallery, House

5) Gallery, Sant Building

6) Music Room, House


7) Galleries, Goh Annex

8) Gallery, Sant Building

9) Rothko Room

Archival Photos


1) Marjorie and Duncan Phillips in front of Renoir's Luncheon of the Boating Party (1880-81), ca. 1954. Photo by Naomi Savage.

2) Duncan Phillips, founder of The Phillips Collection. Photo by Clara E. Sipprel, ca. 1922.

3) Duncan Phillips on a transatlantic journey, 1920s. Courtesy of The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.


4) The house at 21st and Q Streets, NW, ca. 1900.