History And Context


John Sloan stated that he reveled in the “drab, shabby, happy, sad, and human” life he found in the seamier parts of the city. In the etching Night Windows, the viewer peers out what is presumably a window, across the alley, looking in on the surrounding neighbor’s nighttime activities. Sloan’s subjects are voyeuristic and, here, the viewer is implicated as a spectator in one of the human dramas that Sloan glimpsed in New York. Sloan wrote in 1910, “The subject of the plate [Night Windows] is one which I have had in my mind—night, the roofs back of us—a girl in dishabille at a window and a man on the roof smoking his pipe and taking in the charms while at a window below him his wife is busy hanging out the washed linen.” Sloan drew inspiration from his neighborhood in New York, making images of its people and habits. This plate was exhibited at the 1913 Armory Show.

More Works by John Sloan In the Collection


Combing Her Hair
John Sloan
1913
Connoisseurs of Prints
John Sloan
1905
Fifth Avenue Critics
John Sloan
1905

Hell Hole
John Sloan
1917
The Lafayette
John Sloan
1928
Landscape with Cow
John Sloan
not dated

McSorley's Back Room
John Sloan
1916
The Picture Buyer
John Sloan
1911
Six O'Clock, Winter
John Sloan
1912